Federal State Budgetary Institution
National Medical Research Radiological Center
of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation

(FSBI NMRRC of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation)

8 (495) 150-11-22
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National Radiation Epidemiological Register

NATIONAL RADIATION EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REGISTER

Radiation-epidemiological sector - National Radiation Epidemiological Register of Medical Radiological Research Center n.a. A.F. Tsyba – branch of FSBI NMRRC of the Ministry of Health of Russia was established to implement the functions of the parent organization of the National Radiation Epidemiological Register (NRER).

The structure of the sector consists of the department of radiation risk assessment and mathematical software of the National Radiation Epidemiological Register (NRER) and two independent scientific divisions - laboratory of radiation-ecological informatics and laboratory of population radiation epidemiology. The Division consists of two laboratories - Laboratory of radiation risks evaluation and mathematical modeling and laboratory of mathematical software of NRER.

Scientists working in the sector specialize in scientific fields such as radiation epidemiology, radiation medicine, radiobiology, dosimetry, computer science, mathematical modeling, and others.

History of the sector starts from the government of the Soviet Union forming in 1986, after the Chernobyl accident, the All-Union Distributed Register (AUDR). The creation of AUDR involved all the republics of the Soviet Union, a large number of scientific and medical institutions. The collapse of the USSR (1991) led to the formation of the Russian State Medical and Dosimetric Register (RSMDR). In 1993, in accordance with the Government Decree of the Russian Federation No. 948 of 22.09.1993 “On state registration of victims of radiation exposure and exposed to radiation from the Chernobyl and other radiation accidents and incidents” National Radiation Epidemiological Register (NRER) was formed based on RSMDR.

On December 30, 2012 the Russian President signed Federal Law No. 329 “On Amendments to Certain Legislative Acts of the Russian Federation to ensure the integration of health status changes of certain categories of citizens exposed to radiation”, aimed at improving NRER as the state information systems of personal data of citizens exposed to radiation as a result of the Chernobyl disaster and other radiation accidents, nuclear tests and other radiation accidents and incidents with a view to taking into account the changes in the health status of citizens in the course of life for future help them address health care, as well as the prediction of medical radiological consequences, including remote ones.

More information on the National Radiation Epidemiological Register can be found atwww.nrer.ru.

Deputy Director for Science

(Radiation-epidemiological sector - National Radiation Epidemiological Register)

Victor Konstantinovich IVANOV

IVANOV
Victor Konstantinovich
Honored Scientist of Russia, corresponding member of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Doctor of Technical Sciences, Professor, Deputy Director of MRRC Russian Ministry of Health, Head of Radiation-epidemiological sector - the National Radiation Epidemiological Register, chairman of the Russian Scientific Commission on Radiological Protection at the Russian Academy of Sciences

Phone:+7 (48439) 9-33-90, 9-32-15, 9-31-14

Born on March 25, 1952 in the city of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan. From 1969 to 1975 he studied at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, specialty “Applied Mathematics”. In 1975 he entered the graduate school of the Institute of Management Problems of the USSR Academy of Sciences and in 1979 he defended his thesis. Since 1978 he started working at the Institute of Medical Radiology of the AMS of the USSR, in 1994 he was appointed Deputy Director of the Centre. In 1987 V.K. Ivanov defended his thesis for the degree of Doctor of Technical Sciences. In 2002 he was elected a Corresponding Member of the RAMS.

V.K. Ivanov created a scientific school with a feature of an in-depth analysis of the possible radiation risks of remote radiological effects of low doses. These studies are a priority at the global level because after the atomic bombing in 1945 of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the main attention was focused on the assessment of the radiological consequences in the medium and high doses for the population. Under his leadership there were produced 15 doctoral and master's theses.

V.K. Ivanov is the author and co-author of over 400 scientific papers, including 17 books, 3 patents. He is a member of the editorial boards of prestigious domestic and foreign scientific journals: “Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety”, “Radio”, “Journal of Radiation Research”. Since 1992, the Center publishes the Bulletin of the National Radiation Epidemiological Register “Radiation and Risk”, where V.K. Ivanov is the Chief Editor.

Currently, V.K. Ivanov is a co-director of Collaborating Centre of the World Health Organization (WHO) on Radiation Epidemiology and Training, a member of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the chairman of the Russian Scientific Commission on Radiological Protection (RSCRR), one of the leading WHO experts in radiation epidemiology. He is a member of the Public Council and the Presidium of the Scientific Council of State Corporation “Rosatom”.

V.K. Ivanov is a Honored Scientist of Russia, awarded the Order “For Services to the Fatherland” of the IV degree, the Order “Badge of Honor” and “Courage” medal “For Strengthening Military Cooperation” of the Ministry of Defense, the medal “Biosphere and Mankind”, dedicated to the memory of N. V. Timofeev-Resovsky for the development of the fundamental problems of radiation risk assessment, insignia of the State Corporation “Rosatom”, “I.V. Kurchatov” - II degree, as well as P.L. Chebyshev prize for achievements in the fields of mathematics, mechanics, computer science.


Marat Adilevich MAKSYUTOV

МАКСЮТОВ 
Marat Adilevich

Ph.D., Deputy Head of Radiation-Epidemiological Sector - National Radiation Epidemiological Register

Phone: +7 (48439) 9-32-59

Born on September 27, 1962. From 1980 to 1986 he studied at the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, specialty “Applied Mathematics”. In 1992 he defended his thesis at the St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (on specialty 05.13.09 - management of biological and medical systems).

M.A. Maksyutov works in MRRC since 1986. From 1995 to present - Deputy Head of the National Radiation Epidemiological Register, Head of the Department of Radiological Information Technology of NRER.

M.A. Maksyutov research interests are associated with the creation of large-scale medical information systems for the analysis and prediction of the radiological consequences of radiation accidents and incidents. Under the leadership of M.A. Maksyutov there were created software packages for the management and analysis of medical and dosimetric data bases for regional and subject levels of NRER, which is operated in all regions of Russia, and allows one to receive and analyze information from more than 4,000 medical institutions of the country

M.A. Maksyutov is the author of over 150 scientific papers (40 of them are published in leading international journals), including five monographs. M.A. Maksyutov is a member of the Russian Scientific Commission on Radiological Protection, a part of the editorial board of the NRER Bulletin “Radiation and Risk”.

M.A. Maksyutov is awarded the medal of “For Services to the Fatherland” Order of the II degree (2013), medal “For Strengthening Military Cooperation” of the Russian Ministry of Defense (2004), medal “For faultless service” of EMERCOM of Russia (2006) in 2008 as part of the team of scientists he was awarded the P..L Chebyshev prize for achievements in the fields of mathematics, mechanics, computer science.

Main activities

  • Development of fundamental and applied research in radiation epidemiology and assessment of radiation risks to human health due to radiation from nuclear accidents and incidents; in the production process associated with nuclear technology; in medical radiology procedures;
  • Development of integrated methods for assessing radiation risks of cancer, genetic and somatic diseases, the development and introduction of new informative methods of biological and physical dosimetry study of uncertainties in the reduction of “dose-response” dependence;
  • Scientific and methodological support of work on implementation of the state concept of socially acceptable risk in the field of radiation safety and work on the preparation of national standards and norms of radiation safety;
  • Support of the Collaborating Centre of the World Health Organization (WHO) for research and training in radiation epidemiology staff in order to develop scientific and applied research in the field;
  • The implementation of organizational activities of the Russian Scientific Commission on Radiological Protection (RSCRP), functioning in accordance with the decision of the Security Council of the Russian Federation;
  • Preparation of materials for the NRER “Radiation and Risk” bulletin (included in the list of leading peer-reviewed scientific journals and publications issued in the Russian Federation, which shall publish basic scientific results of doctoral and candidate theses) published in Russian and English, which publishes the works of leading domestic and foreign scientists in such fields of science, as radiation epidemiology, medical radiology, dosimetry, biomedical statistics;
  • Preparation of Russian-language materials for medical radiological consequences in the scientific reports of the Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation United Nations Organization (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

    Information Technology Center of Radiation-Epidemiological Sector – NRER
    Information Technology Center of Radiation-Epidemiological Sector – NRER

Since the mid-1990s, specialists of the departments of the sector are responsible for implementation of many scientific and practical work carried out in the framework of the federal target program “Overcoming the consequences of radiation accidents”, the federal target program “Nuclear and Radiation Safety for 2008 and the period up to 2015” program of joint activities to overcome the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster within the Union State. When carrying out these programs there was obtained new scientific data to improve the efficiency of the complex of measures in the area of health protection of the citizens exposed to radiation.

Main results

The main focus of research of sector specialists has been and remains the assessment of the radiological consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. The most significant results in this area obtained using NRER data. In the late 1940-ies in Japan, a similar register of survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was created. For more than 60 years there, work is underway to study the effect of radiation exposure on human health. Based on the Japanese Register studies there were identified radiation risk factors and models were developed forecasting long-term radiological consequences, recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation United Nations Organization (UNSCEAR).

However, the direct transfer of radiation risk coefficients and models from the Japanese population to any other (including Russia) is not certain, and requires adjustment based on the results of direct radiation and epidemiological studies. National Radiation Epidemiological Register accumulated by now a huge amount of medical and dosimetric data (statistical power of NRER is 5 times the statistical power of the Japanese case), and is the main information basis for evaluating radiation risk, and predicting long-term radiological consequences of radiation accidents for the Russian citizens.

As you know, one of the most acute problems among health consequences of the Chernobyl accident is an increased incidence of cancer of the thyroid gland in the population of contaminated areas of Russia. Throughout the post-accident period, thyroid cancer rates have increased. For the entire population the standardized incidence rate on average surpasses the control rate in Russia by 1.7 times, and for children and adolescents (at the time of the accident) - more than 3 times. To determine the role of radiation risk factor from the total effect of all the factors (including screening effect), NRER conducted a large-scale epidemiological studies. Various methods of statistical processing of the data accumulated in NRER indicate the presence of a significant radiation risk of thyroid cancer only among children and adolescents at the time of the accident due to exposure from incorporated 131I. Taking into account the effects of screening, quantitative estimates of radiation risk, according to the data obtained by NRER, conform to the assessment given in the latest report of UNSCEAR. The group of the radiation risk for thyroid cancer should include children and adolescents (0-17 years) at the time of the Chernobyl accident. The risk per unit dose for boys is almost 3 times higher than for girls. It is important to note that any significant radiation risk of thyroid cancer among the adult population at the time of the Chernobyl accident has not yet been found.

Radiation risks of leukemia induction studies occupy special place in modern radiation-epidemiological studies. It is known that among the radiogenic malignant neoplasms leukemia has a maximum radiation risk and minimal latency. Therefore, a possible excess incidence of leukemia above the spontaneous level may serve as the first objective indicator of the level of radiation exposure to the participants of liquidation of consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe. According to NRER, in the period from 1990 to 1999 the incidence of leukemia in the cohort of liquidators of the Chernobyl accident was significantly higher than control level of Russia (SIR value > 1) and the maximum value corresponds to 1992-1993 - SIR = 2.75. As a result of investigations it was found that during the first ten years of follow-up after the Chernobyl disaster liquidators who received external radiation dose of 150-300 mGy (mean dose - 208 mGy) had a doubling of the incidence rate of leukemia (relative risk is statistically significant and equal to 2.2) when compared to the expected (spontaneous) levels. The excess relative risk per 1 Gy is statistically significant and was 4.4. However, during the observation period from 1997 to the present time there as not established significant differences in the incidence of leukemia among the liquidators who received various doses of radiation. Thus, we can conclude that the liquidators who received external radiation dose of 150-300 mGy (of approximately 28% of the total number of liquidators) had a pronounced risk of radiation-induced leukemia induction during the first ten years after the Chernobyl disaster.

The sector also conducted long-term studies to assess radiation risks over a large number of other oncological and non-oncological diseases and causes of death. The most important results:

  • Produced statistically significant dose dependence (radiation risks) of cancer incidence (mortality) for the liquidators who received external radiation dose of 150 mGy;
  • Produced statistically significant dose dependent incidence (mortality) for cerebrovascular disease and mortality from cardiovascular disease among the liquidators, and the radiation risk increases with increasing dose (dose rate of accumulation);
  • Analysis of the results of many years of medical observation of the population of contaminated areas of Russia did not reveal a statistically significant radiation risk for the individual classes of cancer and non-cancer morbidity and mortality (except for thyroid cancer and diseases such as thyroid goiter and thyroiditis), thus it is necessary to take into account the presence of the obtained in some studies point positive excess relative risk estimates for malignant tumors of the digestive system, and for leukemia;
  • According to the forecast made on the basis of direct NRER research contribution of radiation-caused diseases among liquidators can be estimated as follows: all solid - 5% of the total number of cases identified in the class in a lifetime; leukemia - 22%; diseases of the circulatory system - 3% (in the first place it refers to cerebrovascular disease);
  • Forecast for the residents of the Bryansk region being children at the time of the accident, shows that 1,100 people will become ill by 2020, in 590 (54%) of them the disease is radiation-caused thyroid cancer; Estimate of the proportion of additional cases of breast cancer in areas of the Bryansk region on the basis of the models recommended by UNSCEAR shows that the maximum values for girls born in 1986 reach more than 9% in the south-western districts of the Bryansk region, while at the same time as a result of direct radiation-epidemiological NRER studies relation of the breast cancer and radiation dose is not detected.
  • Analysis of the results of many years of medical observation of the population of contaminated areas of Russia did not reveal a statistically significant radiation risk for the individual classes of cancer and non-cancer morbidity and mortality (except for thyroid cancer and diseases such as thyroid goiter and thyroiditis), thus it is necessary to take into account the presence of the obtained in some studies point positive excess relative risk estimates for malignant tumors of the digestive system, and for leukemia;

The results of scientific and practical research conducted on the basis of NRER data on radiological health consequences occupy a significant place in the final reports of such authoritative international organizations on Radiological Protection as the Scientific Committee on the Effects of the United Nations of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), etc.

Cooperation

Employees of Radiation epidemiological sector constantly taken active part in international research projects and perform a lot of work in the framework of Collaborating Centre of the World Health Organization (WHO) established in 1995 on the basis of the sector for research and training of personnel in radiation epidemiology for development of scientific and applied research in this area. The most significant international projects, involving employees of RES include: IPHECA (International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl accident); FGI (International research program “German-French Languages Initiative for Chernobyl”); CANUC (International research project on cancer risk as a result of chronic exposure to nuclear industry workers). The results of the sector specialists within the framework of the WHO Collaborating Centre and international projects, as the basis of materials of the Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation United Nations Organization (UNSCEAR) ON actual and projected health effects of the Chernobyl disaster.

On the basis of RES there is constantly operating Russian Scientific Commission on Radiological Protection (RSCRP) of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, established at the request of the Russian Federation Security Council, ensuring the development of national radiation safety standards and the harmonization of national and international standards in the field of radiation protection of the population.

National Radiation Epidemiological Register cooperates with international organizations:

WHO - World Health Organization;
IAEA - International Atomic Energy Agency;
IARC - International Agency for Research on Cancer,

as well as the leading international centers:

RRCRM and HE - Republican Research Center for Radiation Medicine and Human Ecology (Gomel, Belarus);
BelCMT - Belarusian Center of Medical Informatics Technology, management and Health Economics (Minsk, Belarus);
USCRM - Ukrainian Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine (Kiev, Ukraine);
RERF - Radiation Effects Research Foundation (Hiroshima, Japan)
GRS - Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (Germany);
IRSN - Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (Paris, France);
NIRS - National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Chiba, Japan);
NRPB - National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom);
ICC - International Chernobyl Center (Ukraine);
RIU - Radiobiological Institute of the University (Munich, Germany).

Research and teaching activities

V.K Ivanov is a Professor of Biology Department of Obninsk State Technical University for Nuclear Power Engineering of MEPhI National Research Nuclear University.
S.Y. Chekin is an Associate Professor of Biology Department of Obninsk State Technical University for Nuclear Power Engineering of MEPhI National Research Nuclear University.